All the Wrong Things: The Man Who Knew Too Much

This month’s theme is “Sleuths & Spies,” so I’m writing about a man who’s a bit of both.

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Paul Milner: The Everyday Sleuth

Although Detective Chief Superintendent Christopher Foyle is most the center of this drama (with his name in the title, seems only fair, haha), and comes up with the final piece needed to solve every case, for this article I wanted to focus on another member of the main detective trio as he appeared through Seasons 1-5, Detective Sergeant Paul Milner. Continue reading

Arriving in Paradise

Okay, let’s be honest with each other. It’s mid-February and winter is dragging its feet and the snowy blues seem like they will NEVER LEAVE! You look out the window and its 14 degrees out and grey and yucky and summer feels like it will never brighten the skies again. Yikes! So humans do the next logical thing. We fantasize about a nice tropical getaway, a paradise with shimmering blue-green water, palm trees, eighty-five degree breezes and a chilled, sparkling glass of murder. Wait, what? That last bit doesn’t fit? Oh, but what if you’re a sleuth, keen on solving mysteries, including that most morbid of its kind: murder? Or better yet, what if that’s your job! Continue reading

March / April 2019: Espionage & Sleuthing

Spies have existed since the world began. Humans create conflict. People take sides. To win, one must undercut the other. Thus, espionage is born. It forms the basis of many popular franchises, from the Borne movies to James Bond. From back alley dealings in Tudor times to Russian informants in the Cold War, fictional and historical figures have learned suspicion.

In this issue of Femnista, we explore the spies and sleuths who made an impression. We hope you will find old favorites… and new fascinations.

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Time for Love: Lucy/Wyatt/Jessica on Timeless

Familiar to any regular television watcher (or any YA novel reader), the love triangle trope has a long history and will probably never go away. Few use it well, however. The device itself lends to drama, so often that becomes the purpose of the storyline instead of furthering the relationships and character development. Timeless is a recent example of a love triangle done well on television. The Lucy/Wyatt/Jessica plotline is that rare thing—a love triangle well-executed for a vast majority of its screen time. Continue reading

Pride, Prejudice, & Deceit

It is a truth universally acknowledged that the love triangle trope is as popular now as it was when it was first invented. No matter how many versions, how many different settings, and situations—it never grows old. We like it when the heroine feels torn between two different men and must make a heart-wrenching decision. Jane Austen was perhaps the queen of the love triangle since it featured so often in her novels. My favorite of hers is in Pride and Prejudice, because the Lizzy, Darcy, and Wickham are so closely linked. The introductions of Darcy and Wickham propels Lizzy’s story forward, and it’s a catalyst for Lizzy’s prejudice against Darcy and preference for Wickham. Continue reading

Heart vs. Head in Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is essentially a story about a girl who has to decide between her heart and her head. Catherine grew up with Heathcliff, who is so much like Catherine there are multiple times in the novel where they yell that the other is a part of themselves. Catherine famously declares she “is Heathcliff.” She says “whatever souls are made of [Heathcliff’s] and [hers] are the same.” In addition, when Catherine dies, Heathcliff tells Nelly, “I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul.” It’s all romantic and makes the reader—perhaps a bit guiltily—swoon. Continue reading

Collapsing a Triangle

I’ll be honest. I took way too long to settle on a topic for this issue, “Love Triangles.”

I sat and stared at my blank computer screen, racking my brains for something—anything!—yet coming up empty. Finally, I complained to a dear friend (and fellow Femnista writer). “Where have all the good love triangles gone? Why, oh why, can’t I think of one?”

Her response was immediate: “Sense and Sensibility! Your favorite Austen story!”

And lo, out of darkness, there appeared a great light… in my brain, that is. “Oh.” Continue reading

A Siren Call: Love in The Pirates of the Caribbean

Have you ever wondered why a heroine makes the romantic choice she does, because you would have chosen someone else? That difference of opinion has often happened to me over the years, but never more than in the first Pirates of the Caribbean. Seated in the theater, my hands in a popcorn bucket and eyeballs glued to the screen, I knew if I had been lucky enough to be in Elizabeth’s shoes, I would have picked not the dashing and romantic Will Turner, but the witty and reliable James Norrington! Continue reading