The Horror Was For Love

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY ELORA SHORE

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Memories are born in sepia, and colored with the blood of the past; things that happened, things that could have, things that almost did. Our future is a thing crafted by the fragments left behind…and the stories we take with us. It has been said that the past follows in the footsteps of the present, whether we like it or not—it is a refrain that never ceases to play, but may change with time. Continue reading The Horror Was For Love

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Vincent Price Double Dare

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY CAITLIN HORTON

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I admit it, I am that individual who jumps at their own shadow and can count the modern horror movies they’ve seen on one hand. One finger, actually. And I watched it during the day with light pouring from every lamp and the mute button on and discovered that without scary sounds and music, modern horror is, well, cheap and melodramatic and very much pantomime. So how I wound up watching two 1950s horror movies with Vincent Price in one week and liking them is still a mystery! Perhaps it’s because I know that pre-1960s films had to adhere to a stricter film decency code and only so much “horror” could actually take place. But more likely it’s because I knew it would be a more surreal, more artistic horror that leaves much to the imagination. Continue reading Vincent Price Double Dare

A Touch of Bedlam

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY SCARLETT GRANT

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The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word Bedlam as “a scene of uproar and confusion.” Bedlam was also one of the alternative names of Bethlem Royal Hospital (also known as St. Mary Bethlehem and Bethlehem Hospital). Located in London, this medical institution is Europe’s oldest and first center to specialize in mental illnesses. It is also infamous for being for one of the most notorious asylums in history. Continue reading A Touch of Bedlam

Consuming the Past: The Lone Ranger

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY RACHEL KOVACINY

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When I first went to see the 2013 film version of The Lone Ranger, the last thing I expected was a film that involved people coming back from the dead, a horse that could fly, and cannibalism. Especially the cannibalism. Tonto and Silver working some kind of magic to heal the ranger’s wounds wasn’t a big surprise. After all, the original radio and TV series both involved him being nursed back to health by Tonto after being left for dead. And Silver has always been an exceedingly intelligent, powerful character in his own right, so him being portrayed as a spirit horse with special powers didn’t feel like a big stretch either. Besides, the whole film is a legend being told by a very old Tonto to an impressionable, credulous little boy, so those changes seem more like embellishments old Tonto uses to make the story more exciting, rather than strictly factual occurrences. Continue reading Consuming the Past: The Lone Ranger

Time Marches On

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY CARISSA HORTON

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Time is cruelty for Miss Havisham, the eccentric owner of Satis House in Charles Dickens’ fine novel Great Expectations. The progression of time drives her mad; to protect what little sanity she has left she must stop time’s progression. It’s impossible to do so. Time is powerful and in its willful determination to do as God dictates, Miss Havisham leads a fantasy life where she protects herself from the hurt of abandonment. Continue reading Time Marches On

A King’s Madness

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY SCARLETT GRANT

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Known in America as a tyrant and in the United Kingdom as a man who weakened the power of the British Empire, King George III is a person who has gone through multiple evaluations and re-evalutations. During the majority of his almost 60 year long reign, George III is generally seen as a competent ruler. However, other than his role in the American Revolution, George is remembered for his long history of mental health problems. Continue reading A King’s Madness

Ghost Stories

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY MARIANNA KAPLUN

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Curious thing, but we don’t often hear about happy, friendly ghosts. More often they seem to be unfriendly spirits who cannot rest. In August 1901 one English woman Miss Charlotte Anne Moberley visited France. When she walked through the Petit Trianon, a small château in the grounds of the Palace of Versailles, she saw a woman at the window of a building, which was not there in 1901. Continue reading Ghost Stories

Facing Our Inner Demons

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY CHARITY BISHOP

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Do you ever contemplate what you might be like if you took a path other than the one you chose and wonder, how would my life be different? What about the darkness inside me? What might I be like if I gave into it? Do I look into it or glance away? Do I bring it into the light, and process it, or do I hide it deep in my soul, and pretend it doesn’t exist? Continue reading Facing Our Inner Demons

Gone Gothic: The Turn of the Screw

HALLOWEEN 2016: BY RACHEL SEXTON

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Typically, the horror genre can be separated into the slasher type of story and the psychological thriller. This is true in the mediums of both literature and film. One is defined by the fact that the audience is shown all the violence and gore, while the other revels in the power of suggestion. An even further focusing of genre leads fans of psychological scares into the realm of the Gothic ghost story. Setting is a key characteristic of this type of tale (an isolated place, usually a large house, often in Victorian England), but a classic example of the genre also pioneers a narrative technique now popular in thrillers: the unreliable narrator. The Turn of the Screw achieves ambiguity and atmosphere through its use of an unreliable narrator and the story is all the more frightening because of it. Continue reading Gone Gothic: The Turn of the Screw