Monthly Archives: May 2018

Remember Who You Are: Shakespeare’s Lion King

Simba, son of the strongest lion king of the animal kingdom Mufasa and his wife Sarabi, will inherit the Kingship of the Pride Lands. But his jealous uncle Scar wants to take away from him what is rightfully his—his family, his kingdom, his pride. After the long years, the Ghost of Simba’s father tries to point him the right way… Continue reading

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“What a Legend Needs”

Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword does not feature a quest for the Holy Grail. Not once does someone in it sing about how fun it is to be happily-ever-aftering in Camelot. You won’t find a single Roman cavalry officer who wants to retire. It has no young Viking princes seeking a spot at the round table. And Merlin? He gets name-checked a few times, and there’s one shot of him in a flashback, but that’s it. Lancelot and Guinevere don’t even get a mention. Continue reading

The Shape of Water

Women falling in love with monsters is nothing new. Beauty and the Beast is just that—a beautiful young woman falls in love with a monster and the power of true love turns the scary monster into a handsome prince. Even outside the realm of fairy tales, later stories such as The Phantom of the Opera, or the Francis Ford Coppola 1992 adaptation of Dracula had the female lead falling in love with a monster. Even then, the Phantom has the gift of music to woo Christine and Dracula can use his powers to turn into a handsome younger man. Continue reading

The Greatest Showman: Re-Imagining An American Myth

P.T. Barnum was an all-American scrapper, a self-built from the bottom up businessman of the highest caliber, a man who saw money-making opportunities everywhere he looked, and, was ahead of his time and in others, was very much a product of his times. Most famous for creating the recently retired Barnum & Bailey Circus, last year filmmakers took his life as loose inspiration for the crowd-pleasing, slow-burn box office smash, The Greatest Showman. Continue reading

In This Issue…

Writers have re-imagined stories for generations. Oral storytelling changed when written tales achieved popularity, and over the years, authors, directors, and playwrights have approached the same themes and topics with unique flourishes. From Hollywood remakes to a new twist on a familiar tale, this month we bring you an assortment of delightful stories made new… Continue reading