March / April 2019: Espionage & Sleuthing

Spies have existed since the world began. Humans create conflict. People take sides. To win, one must undercut the other. Thus, espionage is born. It forms the basis of many popular franchises, from the Borne movies to James Bond. From back alley dealings in Tudor times to Russian informants in the Cold War, fictional and historical figures have learned suspicion.

In this issue of Femnista, we explore the spies and sleuths who made an impression. We hope you will find old favorites… and new fascinations.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Arriving in Paradise, by Caitlin Horton

Paul Milner: The Everyday Sleuth, by Kirsty Pearce

All The Wrong Things: The Man Who Knew Too Much, by Jessica Prescott

Men of Honor: General Washington and Major Andrรฉ, by Charity Bishop

Marvel’s Agent Carter: We Know Our Value, by Eva-Joy Schonhaar

Aphra Behn: The Unsuccessful Spy, by Scarlett Grant

Where Eagles Dare, by Rachel Kovaciny

Mission: Accomplished, by Rachel Sexton

Macgyver: A Childhood Hero, by Carissa Horton

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6 thoughts on “March / April 2019: Espionage & Sleuthing

  1. evaschon

    I LOVE that you chose TURN for the banner because I love that show. I was actually wishing I could write this month’s article about it, but I do love Agent Carter so yeah. ๐Ÿ™‚ But it’s definitely a great spy show!

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    1. Charity Post author

      My article wound up more about the historical figures than TURN, but hopefully you will still enjoy it. ๐Ÿ™‚

      I have to admit, I do not like TURN for a variety of reasons, but the main one is that as an amateur historian, them turning a famous abolitionist into a sociopath for dramatic effect makes my blood boil. They should have invented a villain if they wanted a sociopath and not used John Simcoe’s name.

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      1. evaschon

        Oh, I figured your article would be about the historical figures. ๐Ÿ™‚

        I can see how that would be a fly in the ointment, so to speak. I feel like I need to read stuff from Simcoe’s POV, just to get a balanced picture.

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