Author Archives: Charity

About Charity

Charity loves to discuss theology and write books. You can find out more about her passion projects at www.charitysplace.com.

The Ship of Souls: Salt to the Sea

“I wept because I had no shoes, until I met a man who had no feet.”

These simple words lie at the heart of Ruta Sepetys’ World War II masterpiece, Salt to the Sea. In it, she tells the story of the greatest maritime disaster in history: the wreck of the Wilhelm Gustloff. A Soviet submarine sank this German ocean liner on January 30, 1945. A staggering nine thousand people perished. (By comparison, the Titanic’s death toll was one thousand five hundred.) Because the Gustloff’s passengers were refugees from Nazi-occupied lands, their deaths went largely unreported and unmourned in the English-speaking world. I have a bachelor’s and a master’s in history, yet Sepetys’ fictional account was the first I ever heard of this tragedy.

Continue reading
Advertisements

The Gliders: WWII’s Unsung Heroes

Growing up, I had heard my grandfather fought in WWII, but as a kid I really didn’t know in what capacity. My family knew the basics: he was in the ETO; at various points he was in Iceland, England, France, and Germany; he had medals; and worked with the gliders. He rarely spoke of his service and on the off-chance he did, he was vague. Everyone knew better than to pry too much. He avoided flying and planes, and later in life, he suffered PTSD. When he passed, his secrets and experiences died with him.

Continue reading

Daughters of Fortune: WWII in Fiction

Written by Judith Pella, the four books which make up this series mark the starting point for much of my fascination with the 1940s. Following the stories of three very different American sisters, through their experiences Pella brilliantly brings to vivid life many of the divergent perspectives and events that occurred across continents throughout WWII.

Continue reading

James Herriot: All Creatures Great And Small

I both love and dread reading British author James Herriot. I love him because I consider him to be one of the greatest writers of all time. And I dread reading him, because any story of his that features a dog or cat will make me cry. Since I usually listen to his books on audio with the rest of the family, this means a lot of discreet eye-wiping and some flat out bawling into my coloring book.

Continue reading

The Time Capsule

Today is not someday August 2019. Today you have time traveled back to a pivotal event in world history: Sunday, September 3rd, 1939. You are sitting in your comfy armchair, your slippered feet propped up on a moquette covered footstool, and hearing these chilling words from Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain as you tune into your Bakelite wireless set; “This morning the British Ambassador in Berlin handed the German government a final note stating that unless we heard from them by eleven o’clock that they were prepared at once to withdraw their troops from Poland a state of war would exist between us. I have to tell you now that no such undertaking has been received, and that consequently this country is at war with Germany.”

Continue reading

As Time Goes By: The Legacy of Casablanca

Over the history of cinema, the term “classic” has become almost synonymous with the black and white films of the 1930’s and ‘40’s. This is not simply because they are old; many of them are just good movies. The reason for this probably rests with the fact that the studio system of production combined with filmmakers fully grasping what the art form was capable of. It’s no wonder that a film from this era, like Casablanca, can endure in a special way. Nostalgia plays an integral part in the love story in Casablanca, and in the lasting appeal the film continues to enjoy.

Continue reading

The Fabulous Forties: Romanticizing a Harrowing Period

People talk a lot about the glamour of the 1940s.

Of course, we all know what they mean. The classy outfits. The perfectly curled hair. Epic Hollywood blockbusters and dazzling Hollywood stars, from Casablanca to Citizen Kane, from Bergman to Bogart. Swing bands and soda fountains and “going steady” … and over it all, the distant rumble of foreign war. Just foreign enough to be thrilling, rather than terrifying.

Continue reading

Sept / Oct 2019: The 1940s

The 1940s bring a lot of things to mind. Glamorous Hollywood starlets. Fabulous hairstyles. Some of the most memorable movies of all time. And of it, of course, looms the Second World War. This issue of Femnista explores a little of everything, from a veterinarian in the British downs to the dirty streets of New York city, to the harrowing adventures of Glider pilots. We hope to introduce you to some new favorites, and commemorate some classic films. Enjoy.

Continue reading

Tapping into the Deep Magic: A Quiet Place

Does humanity tend toward pessimism whenever it looks toward the future? When watching and reading dystopian fiction, the answer appears to be yes. These futuristic worlds take place after a disaster of gigantic proportions—an invasion, a plague, a natural disaster. Most of these worlds are atheistic in design and pit their protagonist against overwhelming odds, in a bid for their own survival. ††Which begs the question, from where do these ideas come? Why does humanity look forward with trepidation? Dystopian is never about an improved world; always, something sinister forces people into survival-mode, where they turn on each other. Prehistoric creatures unleashed from a cave, aliens, robots, etc. Whatever the cause, it becomes a survivalist story.

Continue reading