Category Archives: from the editor

2019 Themes: Writer Sign-Up!

I’ve announced our 2019 upcoming issues! Please visit this page to find out what’s coming soon — and if you’re a writer, sign up (either comment or e-mail me directly). Thank you so much, and I look forward to collaborating with you! ❤ Charity

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Nov / Dec 2018: Age of Innocence

Storytellers have filled the world with childhood heroes and heroines for generations. From Romeo & Juliet to Harry Potter, some of our most beloved literature comes from children’s literature. It teaches, it inspires, and it never leaves our hearts. This issue of Femnista focuses on the wonderful children’s stories that remind us of our own childhood. Continue reading

Halloween 2018: Sherlock Holmes Week

No literary detective is more famous than Sherlock Holmes. The most popular and iconic literary character of all time (only Dracula has as many spin-offs and adaptations), Holmes has stood as a beacon of genius since A Study in Scarlet first appeared in The Strand Magazine. Audiences have loved him through countless adaptations of The Hound of the Baskervilles. They have bought numerous pastiches. Read many adventures that mention Holmes (books about his sister, his illegitimate daughter – what? – his wife, his friends, even Irene Adler!) Hollywood continues to churn out movie after movie, and television is never far behind. For Halloween week, we celebrate Sherlock Holmes! Continue reading

July / Aug 2018 Articles

Revolution. The word sends a chill up the most hardened spine. History has seen countless bloody conflicts, most of which resulted in mass losses of life and innocent victims. In this issue, we explore them in all their gruesomeness, to remind ourselves that change never comes without great cost. Check back each Saturday for a new article!

IN THIS ISSUE:

Love Can Be a Revolution: Doctor Zhivago, by Rachel Sexton

Music Makers: Joseph Plunkett and the Irish Easter Rising, by Jessica Prescott

The Origins of a Monster: The Regency Sexual Revolution, by Charity Bishop

Let Them Eat Cake: The Real Marie Antoinette, by Scarlett Grant

The Russian Revolution, by Veronica Leigh

The Dangers of Patriotic Zeal: Taras Bulba, by Rachel Kovaciny

Olympe de Gouges, by Scarlett Grant

Thank you, and please enjoy our historical reflections!

 

In This Issue…

Writers have re-imagined stories for generations. Oral storytelling changed when written tales achieved popularity, and over the years, authors, directors, and playwrights have approached the same themes and topics with unique flourishes. From Hollywood remakes to a new twist on a familiar tale, this month we bring you an assortment of delightful stories made new… Continue reading

March / April 2018: Super Heroes

Since the tremendous success of the first all-star Spider-Man over a decade ago, Hollywood has filled theater seats with all kinds of super heroes, from large and green with anger issues to plated in iron or with steel claws. Here, we explore some of our favorite big screen super heroes and their comic book origins. Continue reading

Celebrating Black Heroes

This month, Femnista celebrates remarkable individuals throughout history who have left an impression on us, either through their contributions to social advancement, entertainment, or who lived extraordinary lives simply because society would not allow them to do otherwise. We invite you to join us as we explore some of our favorites, and share your heroes with us in the comments! Continue reading

Femnista Nov / Dec 2017: Past & Present

Some stories transcend time, and capture our hearts across generations. In the 1980s, the film Somewhere in Time popularized a romance across different eras. The haunting Time Traveler’s Wife has enchanted more modern audiences, as does Outlander. From a time-traveling car to a Police Phone Box (with its famous two-hearted alien occupant)… the idea of time continues to captivate us. It passes with each moment. A life can come and go in the blink of an eye. It marches ever onward, to remind us life is not constant and never the same. But sometimes, we long for a different life… one from the past… Continue reading

Halloween 2017: The Victorian Era

The public knows no era better for ghost stories, vampire fiction, and superstition than the Victorian era. The arrival of science began to dispel old myths, but many authors clung to the “old ways” through an upturn in Gothic Fiction, and the Victorian era also produced many of the most popular classic novelists. Dickens took long walks in the dingy London streets. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes ran wild in the imaginations of impressionable readers. The Brontë sisters penned famous novels in the moors. Penny Dreadful sold on each street corner. Jack the Ripper scandalized Europe with his gruesome murders. And… the world continues to look to the Victorian Era for inspiration, for harrowing tales, and for glimpses of humanity’s darker natures.

In this issue, we feature six Victorian-era topics for you to savor on a chilly October afternoon.

IN THIS ISSUE:

A Maddening Crowd of Suitors, by Rachel Sexton

The Elephant Man, by Scarlett Grant

Dangerous Illusions: The Women of Beguiled, by Charity Bishop

The Brontë Sisters, by Victoria Leigh

Haunted by the Hound, by Rachel Kovaciny

The Turn of the Screw, by Carol Starkey

Join us November 1st for a sneak preview into our next issue, Through Time.

The Old West (July / August 2017)

Nothing captures the popular imagination more than the Old West. Full of Native Americans, gunslingers, trappers, bank robbers, cattle rustlers, and US Marshals, it promises adventure and romance. From western dime novels to spaghetti westerns, endless stories centered on the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of settling the American west. Legendary characters like Wild Bill Hitchcock and Annie Oakley live on in our imaginations. Old Hollywood put out hundreds of westerns, including a few classics that stand the test of time. Their heroes fought rustlers, sought revenge for murderous wrongs, and sometimes rode off into the sunset with a woman. Or their trusty horse. Continue reading