Category Archives: literature

Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne is one of my favorite authors. His blatant use of symbols and clear messages about life through his stories is refreshing since, being an English major, my professors often tasked me with finding “deeper meanings” in texts. The back of my mind always wondering, “Does there have to be a deeper meaning?”

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The Gothic Stories of Angela Carter

 Anticipation is the greater part of pleasure

The Bloody Chamber (or The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories) is a collection of short Gothic novels by English writer Angela Carter. She bases the stories on fairy tales, especially the folk tales of French collector Charles Perrault, whose prose Carter translated beforehand. Carter rewrites the plots of famous fairy tales in a unique style. This article contains a few spoilers.

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Daniel Kean: My Favorite Fictional Character

Thousands of people the world over know and love Louisa May Alcott’s classic story of sisterhood, Little Women. But what not as many people know is Alcott wrote a follow-up book called Little Men. (There is also Jo’s Boys, but I won’t be getting into that travesty in this article.)  Little Men follows the various adventures and mishaps of the young students at Jo Bhaer’s country school, Plumfield.  One of these boys, Daniel Kean (‘Dan’), has become my favorite fictional character and I’m here to tell you why.

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The Fear of Voiceless Ghosts and the Hunger for Reconciliation—“The Bonesetter’s Daughter” by Amy Tan

What if a little girl could get a better childhood through silence? What if she could get attention, affection, gifts and praise beyond her imagination for following one rule: don’t speak a single word? At a crucial moment, this seemed to be a very real option for six-year-old Ruth Young in The Bonesetter’s Daughter.

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Haunted by the Past: The Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Fictional Trauma

Halloween is a time for hauntings.

This month, we dig out our favorite scary movies to watch, transfixed, as angry mummies, homicidal circus clowns, demonic babies, psychotic dolls, and their ilk chase our intrepid herores all over God’s green earth. It’s no fun, being stalked by a supernatural Super-Freak. But you know what’s even worse? Being stalked by your own memories.

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The Second Mrs. de Winter

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”

The second Mrs. de Winter opens the mysterious novel of Rebecca with that single, dramatic line. Over the years, readers have drawn parallels between the novels Rebecca and Jane Eyre, another romantic gothic tale of an innocent young woman and a worldly older man. Similarly, the man’s first wife casts a shadow over the young woman, and haunts her. A masterful estate acts as a background character, but in my opinion, that is where the parallels end. Du Maurier insisted Rebecca was the study in jealousy, inspired by her own feelings of her husband’s first love. The second Mrs. de Winter is not Jane Eyre… she is far more complex and enigmatic than we give her credit for. There is a darkness within her.

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The Dark Prince

He lost everything in one night… his mother, brother, and father’s support. All that’s left was a memory of thorns that saved young prince of Ancrath from death, but forever robbed him of everything else. He’ll become a prince, then king, and finally the emperor of thorns. But at the end he’ll meet with his main nightmare, who follows in his wake and who has something to ask Jorg Ancrath, Lord of Thorns…

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