Light and Darkness: Men of the Hunger Games

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY RACHEL SEXTON

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Since the popularity of Harry Potter shifted into high gear, the category of books known as young adult has steadily increased to become a major profitable section of the market. The Twilight series was a huge success and the number of entries aimed at teen readers has grown even more recently. Fantasy and paranormal romance remain fixtures in this type of writing, but another genre has appeared and taken off in popularity: the dystopian thriller. The main character usually faces an oppressive future government and must fight for their lives and those of the ones they love. One of the earliest examples of the dystopian fiction boom is one of the most critically adored and will soon have it’s own film adaptation. The Hunger Games trilogy manages distinctive character development amid a furiously-paced plot and the characters of Peeta and Gale leave a unique and memorable impression. Continue reading Light and Darkness: Men of the Hunger Games

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Captain of the Nautilus

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY CAROL STARKEY

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Captain Nemo from the fanciful novel 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea has always fascinated me. He’s definitely not the good guy, yet he’s not so easy to place under the term “bad guy,” either. So what is he? Continue reading Captain of the Nautilus

Two Exemplary Men: Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY MEGHAN M. GORECKI

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There are countless heroes in the world of literature and film who have captured the imagination and hearts of the public for years. Some dwell in the privileged circle of the Regency Era; other are cast in darker, gothic stories; in Anglo-Saxon England or across the pond in the United States during the Westward Expansion, Civil War, or in the deep South. Rhett Butler, Robin Hood, Darcy, Heathcliff and Ivanhoe are just a few of the great men in novel and film! Clark Gable epitomized the role of Rhett Butler; Errol Flynn was a swashbuckling rogue in more than one film, and Lawrence Olivier was the very first Fitzwilliam Darcy on screen. These heroes of classic literature, portrayed multiple times over, are beloved by the public not because they are perfect or even believable, but because they tell a unique, magnificent story that whisks us away into another time. Continue reading Two Exemplary Men: Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch

Distinctly Thornton

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY HANNAH KINGSLEY

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Of all the characters I have discovered in 19th Century novels, the one that has been the most believable as a male figure is John Thornton, of Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South and the BBC miniseries by the same name. In books there are male characters who fight deftly with swords, men who recite sonnets and are of feeling; men who are heroic, witty, cunning, or kind. And then there is Mr. Thornton. He has many traits but in a manner that proves distinctly and realistically male. This is likely why Gaskell’s creation of him has become one of the most popular of literary men. Continue reading Distinctly Thornton

The Count of Monte Cristo: Shadows and Secrets

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY RISSI C.

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There is a moment when Alan Rickman confidently strides across the screen as Colonel Brandon and glimpses Marianne for the first time; he is completely lost to her. Highlighted in that short scene is an expression of a man besotted, and to this day it is one of my favorite moments in cinema, not merely for that millisecond expression but also because of his long-suffering and gentle patience with the woman he ardently loves. Continue reading The Count of Monte Cristo: Shadows and Secrets

The Greatest Literary Man

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY ELIZA GABE

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Today, I’m afraid this is more than just an invitation to the past. I’m going to break the rules and invite you to the future. Can I do that?

I hope so!

Dr. Lockridge once stated in a sermon that a certain man was the loftiest in literature. Of all the ideas and men in literature, who would be so? There are several “lofty” literary men. From Sherlock Holmes to Superman to Harry Potter to Mr. Darcy, they and many others have become a lasting part of our society for their charm, uniqueness, and attraction. When faced with these literary men, it really is a matter of opinion on who is the best. You can argue all you like with your friends as to whether Mr. Knightly is better than Mr. Darcy or Edward is preferable to Jacob. However, I propose to you that I do know who the greatest literary man is, and not because I’m smart or anything particularly special on my own. Continue reading The Greatest Literary Man

Lydia, I’m in Love!: Advice for Unlucky Literary Lads

SEPT / OCT 2001: BY LYDIA M.

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I have true love for the most beautiful women in the world. She has skin the color of wintery cream and long golden hair. She is beyond perfection. I love her so much that I worked years at hard labor just to hear the sound of her voice. Three years ago I professed my love before leaving to make a life in America for us. Unfortunately, my ship was captured by the Dread Pirate “Bob,” whose motto states “There will be no survivors!”

I survived. Continue reading Lydia, I’m in Love!: Advice for Unlucky Literary Lads

Robin Hood: The People’s Hero

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY CARISSA HORTON

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This man laughs regularly, doesn’t react negatively when he’s bested by a friend in a game, defends a maiden’s honor, and wears green. Or, at least, he’s rumored to wear green! Sound familiar? You would be right in guessing Robin Hood! Yes, that heroic thief of women’s hearts and tax collector’s gold, Robin Hood. Depending on the version you watch, Robin could be blonde or brunette, light eyes or dark, tall and muscular or slim and lithe. He could be portrayed by Errol Flynn or Kevin Costner or even Russell Crowe or (dare I say it) a fox. And there’s no telling exactly what his wardrobe will be! Continue reading Robin Hood: The People’s Hero

Merely Misunderstood: Mr. Darcy

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY ELLA G.

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It is a fact universally acknowledged that first impressions matter more than any of us would like to admit. A person’s physical appearance, their social standing, their behavior and mannerisms are apt to be noticed far more quickly and easily than their innermost thoughts or psychological makeup. Because of these tendencies, our opinion on whether or not we like a person is quickly decided. Sometimes we like what we see; other times we cannot stand it. It is into the later category that Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy falls in Elizabeth Bennett’s mind. Continue reading Merely Misunderstood: Mr. Darcy

Jane Eyre: The Adaptations

SEPT / OCT 2011: BY KATIE S.

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1934 Version (Colin Clive, Virginia Bruce)

Short, sweet and to the point, the oldest available version with sound, it is more slapstick comedy than Victorian Gothic. Jane is quite pretty, while Edward is far more Darcy than Rochester. A silly, but cute little film bearing little to no resemblance to Charlotte Bronte’s novel. Continue reading Jane Eyre: The Adaptations

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