Tag Archives: charity bishop

Fear, Chaos and Pain: The Rise of a Hero

Considered as one of the greatest trilogies of all time by many, The Dark Knight Trilogy by Christopher Nolan chronicles Bruce Wayne’s journey from vengeance into heroism. Each installment carries a theme that pervades the lives of all its characters.

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Favorite Story, Favorite Creator (Nov / Dec 2019)

This issue challenged our contributors to pick a favorite creator or creation, and then explore what they love most about it. From Batman to Edith Warton, we hope you will love exploring these stories anew and perhaps may discover an unexplored favorite of your own!

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James Herriot: All Creatures Great And Small

I both love and dread reading British author James Herriot. I love him because I consider him to be one of the greatest writers of all time. And I dread reading him, because any story of his that features a dog or cat will make me cry. Since I usually listen to his books on audio with the rest of the family, this means a lot of discreet eye-wiping and some flat out bawling into my coloring book.

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Tapping into the Deep Magic: A Quiet Place

Does humanity tend toward pessimism whenever it looks toward the future? When watching and reading dystopian fiction, the answer appears to be yes. These futuristic worlds take place after a disaster of gigantic proportions—an invasion, a plague, a natural disaster. Most of these worlds are atheistic in design and pit their protagonist against overwhelming odds, in a bid for their own survival. ††Which begs the question, from where do these ideas come? Why does humanity look forward with trepidation? Dystopian is never about an improved world; always, something sinister forces people into survival-mode, where they turn on each other. Prehistoric creatures unleashed from a cave, aliens, robots, etc. Whatever the cause, it becomes a survivalist story.

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Asking Deep, Irreverent Questions: Good Omens

Once, a friend paid me a compliment. He said, “You are the most devout ‘irreverent’ person I have ever met.” Okay, maybe it wasn’t a compliment. It was a perplexed, worried statement. I thanked him anyway. As a girl who loves to approach life with humor, even the “serious bits,” as author Terry Pratchett would call them, it’s no surprise I would love the series Good Omens.

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Master Shipbuilder: The Legacy of Thomas Andrews

The gale rocks the scaffolding beneath you. The sweat on your hands causes you to lose your grip on the iron rail. You came up to straighten the boards. Your heart pounds. One foot forward at a time. You can do this. TITANIC needs you. Her iron hull rises beside you. The next brutal gust rocks the narrow platform so much, you cannot take another step. Stranded eighty feet above the ground, you panic.

“Hold on,” someone shouts beneath you. “I’m coming up.”

You focus on breathing. The boards have shifted. You’re too terrified to try climbing down. You sit and wait until a cheerful face appears over the edge. “Hello, Archie,” your pal Thomas Andrews says with his usual grin. “Got yourself in a bind?”

You manage a nervous chuckle. Andrews helps you climb down before he secures the boards himself. Continue reading

Men of Honor: General Washington and Major André

Nobody likes a traitor..

Other than Judas, history has no more famous traitor than Benedict Arnold, whose name has become synonymous with betrayal. A military officer in the American Revolution and a friend of George Washington, Arnold fell to persuasion from Major John André, a British spymaster, into surrendering West Point to the British for £20,000. This would have enabled the British to cut off New England from the rest of the colonies.

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