Tag Archives: the giver

The Giver: The Value of Memories

The Giver will forever (at least, foreseeably) be my favorite dystopian novel. It was the novel that caused my 11-12-year-old self fall in love with reading. The power of the individual to take down an entire society led by adults appealed to my rebellious spirit. It was relatable to me that adults would rob youths of their freedoms under the guise of protecting them (I felt so oppressed… looking back, I have no idea why!). In this book, these adults do it to other adults and even themselves, so ignorant to what they are actually doing, and the author masterfully presents the problematic nature of this “protection.” Through this perceived protection, there is a clear clash of the themes of taking and giving.

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Falling in Love with Reading: The Giver

I grew up home-schooled, which I think for most people implies I was an avid reader. This was true. I read a lot. My mom had a rule I read at least 30 minutes a day, which was no struggle. Reading was so normal and common for me, I didn’t think much about it. It was a time-killing activity I would complete with as much apathy as one who watches infomercials late at night. Sometimes by noon, I had finished with my schoolwork for the day. I would camp out in my room and read for 3 hours. I read in the car, before bed, while I procrastinated instead of doing my required household chores… Continue reading