Tag Archives: veronica leigh

The Lion, The Witch, & the Wardrobe

My Dear Lucy,

I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result, you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still…

Your affectionate Godfather,

CS Lewis Continue reading

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Frances Burney

While now known through Jane Austen aficionados as one of Austen’s favorite novelists, for a while the world largely forgot Frances “Fanny” Burney. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Fanny’s social satires and comedy of manners were the books to read. Young Jane Austen subscribed to a circulating library to read Fanny’s latest novel. It influenced her enough she borrowed from said works and incorporated them in her own canon. The wealthy man’s pursuit of a social inferior, the buffoonish suitor, vulgar relatives, the name Willoughby, the phrase “Pride and Prejudice” itself—all originated with Fanny Burney. Continue reading

Forever Trapped

NOV/ DEC 2017: BY VERONICA LEIGH

A day is 24 hours long, but we often feel that isn’t enough. We try to manage our minutes wisely, to accomplish as much as possible every day. I fall short. More than once I have wished to have more time or I could somehow do something different, to change the course of events. Continue reading

The Brontë Sisters

HALLOWEEN 2017: VERONICA LEIGH

Emily was in an uproar. Known for her volatile temper, she was furious when her older sister Charlotte discovered her private poetry and dared to read it. Her younger sister Anne offered some of her own poetry to read, to keep the peace, which led to a wild suggestion. They could try to publish their work together in a volume, to see if they could turn a profit. They needed money; they needed to find some way to provide for themselves. Continue reading

Queen Esther

SEPT / OCT 2017: BY VERONICA LEIGH

“For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to your royal position for such a time as this?” Esther 4:14.

Queen Esther was born as Hadassah, in 5th century B.C.E., to a Hebrew family. Her family descended from the Tribe of Benjamin, her ancestors were among the Jewish people taken in the remnant exiled to Babylon. After seventy years of exile, some of the Jews returned to Israel, while Hadassah’s branch and many others remained in what became Persia. No one knows what became of Hadassah’s parents, but her cousin Mordecai took her under his wing and raised her. While she and Mordecai lived in a pagan land and associated with unbelievers, we can probably assume that Hadassah had a typical, observant upbringing. Neither she nor Mordecai could have known what lay ahead of her… or their people. Continue reading

Half Pint: The Adventures of Laura Ingalls Wilder

JULY / AUG 2017: BY VERONICA LEIGH

Since America’s beginning (before, really), strong, brave, and intelligent men and women forged their way westward to make new lives for themselves and their families. In the Little House series, Laura Ingalls Wilder chronicled her family’s journey from their home in Wisconsin through various states and territories to the Dakota Territory where they settled permanently. While some scholars now debate the authorship and consider some of the material to be fictional, the basic story is the same. The Laura Ingalls Wilder, the Ingalls family, and many of those she crossed paths with, were pioneers. Continue reading

Sadakeo & the Thousand Paper Cranes

MAY/JUNE 2017: BY VERONICA LEIGH

Some stories you read or hear as a child stay with you for the rest of your life. Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes is one of them. I read it for the first time in Mrs. Jones’ second grade class. She assigned us the book. On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, we had an hour set aside for reading and for a week or so, I spent my time learning the story of Sadak—how she lived her short life and how she died. Though she lived in the 1940’s and 1950’s in Japan, it was easy to fall in love with this bright and beautiful girl. Continue reading